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> Steer Clear Steering System
Corvette
post Aug 7 2010, 08:09 PM
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I was reading an article on this puppy........





When I came across this note "This Steer Clear transfer box avoids having to use a bunch of U-joints in the steering shaft."

So I went looking to see what this Steer Clear thing is.......



First they look like this





Second this is where you may want to use one







Here is a bit about them:

Q. What's Inside Steer Clear? How Is It Made?

A. Steer Clear is made using 3/4" 36 splined input & output shafts. Each shaft is machine welded to a
21- tooth laser cut steel sprocket. Each shaft has two radial ball bearings on it which are held with metal
retaining rings. We use R12-2RS bearings - single row radial conrad-type steel bearings w/double seals.
These bearings are pre-lubricated and never require additional lubrication.

Next we use a #35 ANSI approved single strand, continuous (no master link), preloaded, riveted steel roller
chain. Preloading aligns the various chain components which helps to eliminate initial elongation and increase
the usable service life of the chain. The chain we use has an average tensile strength of 2,134 lbf.

There are four preset chain tensioning guides cut from a sheet of 1" thick Ultra High Molecular Weight
(UHMW) Polyethylene. UHMW is a linear high density polyethylene averaging 3.1 - 6 million molecular weight
which has high abrasion resistance as well as high impact strength. UHMW is also chemical resistant and has a
low coefficient of friction which makes it highly effective in a variety of applications, including it's use in Steer
Clear. UHMW is 6 times more abrasion resistant than steel and virtually unbreakable.

UHMW Characteristics:
• The highest abrasion resistance of any thermoplastic polymer
• Easily machined / fabricated and requires no maintenance
• An excellent sliding material due to low coefficient of friction
• Self-lubricating (non-caking and sticking)
• Outstanding impact strength even at very low temperatures
• No cold embrittlement, works from -155F to + 200F.
• Absorbs no water and is impervious to most chemicals
• Doesn't chip, peel, crack or rot.
• Non conductive, nonmagnetic, and non-fibrous.
• FDA and USDA approved

For Steer Clear's housing we had a custom die made which was then used to make our extruded tube. The
housing is 6060 T5 mill finish aluminum that is cut, formed, welded, and machined to our specifications. The
two bearing caps are C & C machined from 6061 T6 aluminum.


Q. What About Backlash In The Chain? How Much Is There?

A. We only allow a maximum of 1 1/2 degrees backlash which is not very much at all. We set the tensioning
guides during assembly which allows us to carefully control the amount of backlash, and every unit is checked
before being shipped. Then it goes on and on how they test them.......

Link to their site here http://www.wizardsteerclear.com/index.html

My only comment, that chain and the gears/sprokets better be damm good. Apart from that, a neat idea.


--------------------

Motor & Transmission By John Kuiper Race Engines.
Suspension & Brakes By Ron Missian Motor Sports.
To See My Build Album Click On Any Of The Below Pics.

Priscilla, Queen Of The Vettes
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MADVET
post Aug 8 2010, 11:48 AM
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I recall that there was a conversion company in SA using a similar system horizontally to do their RHD conversions.
There was a lot of debate years ago on the merits of this system however i don't think that it's allowed any more.


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Corvette
post Aug 8 2010, 04:35 PM
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Yeah I thought that too. It was an open chain that ran under the dash and a cross bar to do the brake pedal from memory. That chain would have been much, much longer than these units. I was thinking that if a link broke you would be in deep shit but then I suppose if a gear broke in a steering box........

I'd like to see just how thick/big the chain and sprockets are.


--------------------

Motor & Transmission By John Kuiper Race Engines.
Suspension & Brakes By Ron Missian Motor Sports.
To See My Build Album Click On Any Of The Below Pics.

Priscilla, Queen Of The Vettes
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